Published September 8, 2017. The monuments can be categorized in several ways, but include: • Union State, Regiment, Battery and Brigade monuments • Confederate State, Regiment and Artillery monuments • Monuments to Individuals • Monuments representing Union headquarters • Monuments representing Confederate headquarters • Other, such as those recognizing field hospitals, the memorial to Civil War women, etc. There’s no easy way to know how close it is to being complete, but it is gigantic, with more than 13,000 entries related to the Civil War. This monument, which cost $137, was erected at Pioneer Cemetery in Boise, Idaho and unveiled on May 9, 1896 by the Woman’s Relief Corp of the GAR, Phil Sheridan Post. Update Jan. 12, 2018: Mayor Bill de Blasio's monuments commission decided not to completely tear down any statues in New York City. The non-profit Southern Poverty Law Center asserts in a 2016 report that there are “718 [Confederate] monuments and statues, nearly 300 of which are in … Over 23,000 men from New York were at the Battle of Gettysburg, the second largest contingent of any state north or south, making up one quarter of the Army of the Potomac. A 3-stepped granite monument marking the regiment's position on July 2 & 3, 1863, and listing its casualties. ", 90th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Monument, 91st Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers Infantry Monument. Login to request to the join the Trusted List so that you can edit and add images. Brian’s parents were slaves. They were organized into 68 infantry regiments, one infantry battalion, four companies of sharpshooters, seven cavalry regiments, an independent cavalry company and 16 artillery batteries. Please enable JavaScript on your browser to best view this site. (source: Gettysburg National Military Park), Hawthorne, Frederick W. ‘’Gettysburg: Stories of Men and Monuments’’, The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides, Hanover PA 1988 p. 81, Hawthorne, Frederick W. ‘’Gettysburg: Stories of Men and Monuments’’, The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides, Hanover PA 1988 p. 54, Hawthorne, Frederick W. ‘’Gettysburg: Stories of Men and Monuments’’, The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides, Hanover PA 1988 p. 127, 59th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 149th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Soldiers and Sailors Monument (Syracuse, New York), "Obama Awards Medal of Honor to Civil War Veteran,", "Manchester park's Civil War statue being used to repair Gettysburg twin,", "Gettysburg Civil War Women's Memorial Dedication Nov. 16", 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_monuments_of_the_Gettysburg_Battlefield&oldid=995269323, Gettysburg Battlefield monuments and memorials, Lists of American Civil War monuments and memorials, Lists of war monuments and memorials in the United States, Short description is different from Wikidata, Wikipedia articles in need of updating from July 2020, All Wikipedia articles in need of updating, Articles with dead external links from May 2019, Articles with permanently dead external links, Articles with dead external links from December 2017, Articles needing more detailed references, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Inscription: "The grateful people of the state of Arkansas erect this memorial as an expression of their pride in the officers and men of the third Arkansas infantry, Confederate States Army, who by their valor and their blood have made this ground forever hallowed. Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery Monument, Battery B, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery Monument. Killed at Gettysburg on July 2, 13th Pennsylvania Reserves (42nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment) "Bucktails" "1st Rifles", Col. Taylor was the youngest colonel of the Union Army at the time of his death. A unit’s main monument was required to be placed at the location of its main line of battle. The monument is made of brownstone, and has eroded. 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry Regimental Association Monument, 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Monument. At the time of the battle, Battery E was attached to Battery L ("Reynold's Battery"). 78th and 102nd New York Infantry Regiments Monument, 82nd New York Infantry Monument (foreground), North Reynolds Avenue, by the railroad cut, 102nd New York Infantry Monument (See 78th New York Infantry Regiment). Primarily built by veterans of the battle and states to commemorate their sacrifices here, the monuments are typically located where the troops fought during the battle. One of 10 similar Union headquarters markers. The monument features a bronze relief portrait of Colonel Patrick H. O'Rorke. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. almost all of those statues people are so worked up about are soldiers in Union, not Southern, uniforms. A bronze cannon barrel atop a stone base. Civil War Monuments for Union Troops Image 2. This was replaced by the bronze drum and knapsack. Company: Decherd Marble and Granite Company (Decherd, TN). look at the statues closely. Lt. Nicholson (1842-1922) was a veteran of the battle, a military historian. Sedgwick Avenue, north of Wheatfield Road, Battery A, 4th United States Artillery Monument, Battery B, 4th United States Artillery Monument, Battery C, 5th United States Artillery Monument, Battery D, 5th United States Artillery Monument, Battery E, 4th United States Artillery Monument, Batteries E & G, 1st United States Artillery Monument, Battery K, 5th United States Artillery Monument, Companies A, B, D & H, 1st United States Sharpshooters Monument, Companies C, I & K, 1st United States Sharpshooters and Company B, 2nd United States Sharpshooters Monument, Company E, 1st United States Sharpshooters and Companies F & G, 2nd United States Sharpshooters, "The monument marks the position held by Company E, 1st New Hampshire Sharpshooters on July 3, 1863.