A life free from such stains as follies are, Nor can the tongue of him who loved him least, Of thankfulness and kindness: Truth doth leave, The curious eye of a quick-brained survey, Of his too-shortened days, or make a prey, Not that he was above the spleenful sense. Betraying policies, and show their brains, Unto their shame, ridiculous; whose scope. Within the snares of making truth a pawn; Whiles it, not doubting whereinto it enters. Their vain designs, on whom want hath dominion. When death you think is least to be respected! deliver. For private persons, in their private home, As those descended from illustrious blood. Had taught him in both fortunes to be free; Whence now retired home, to a home indeed. Which shall not thence be sundered, but in death. I am herein but a second to the privilege of truth, who can warrant more in his behalf than I undertook to deliver. Of hell, even in the triumph that it stood: May shorten when it please, and justly take. He well provided 'gainst the hand of need. In the meantime, I had found new evidence that convinced me the elegy was Shakespeare's. Hence sprung the deadly fuel that revived, The rage which wrought his end, for had he been, Slacker in love, he had been longer lived. Had been best-speaking witnesses with me; Respect most in itself, as who would scan, His honesty and worth, by them might prove, Cared he to be heard talk, nor in the float. As they will all go weeping to their beds. For popular applause and power's commission. In public view of greatness, whence they come. Whose name is like to live a longer day. 0.4. True friendship, active grace, persuasion sweet, If these, or all of these, knit fast in one. Whereby the grace fore-promised they attained. Purchasing credit in the place I lost it. ‘ “Exercise in this Kind”: Shakespeare and the “Funeral Elegy” for William Peter ’. Which way to wound with defamation's spirit, (Close-lurking whisper's hidden forgeries). of Bowhay in Devon, Esquire. . Whose inward eyes are dimmed with dignity. Will not consume his life and hapless end. Even in which place the subject of the verse, Which now that subject's merits doth rehearse). The chaste embracements of conjugal love, And weep upon those cheeks which nature framed, Of lively sweetness plays, so that ashamed. By vain conceit, to please such ones as know it. remembrance to this departed gentleman, I would not willingly undergo. ", And hope must in despite of fearful change. That lives encompassed in a mortal frame. (A Funeral Elegy) It is natural to wonder why the death of Burbage was a national tragedy, while the passing of Shakespeare himself just three years earlier received such little attention. What more thou didst deserve than in thy name, And free thee from the scandal of such senses, Measure thy course of life, with false pretenses. 0.2. A Funeral Elegy for Master William Peter. Cast down, and utterly decayed at length; When all shall turn to dust from whence we came. TO MASTER JOHN PETER 0.1. of Bowhay in Devon, Esquire. Do feel the greatest loss they could have had. (William Shakespeare?) In death, which only then the good begin. Had all that youth and happy days could give him, Against th' assault of death, who to relieve him, Strook home but to the frail and mortal parts. Funeral Elegy by William Shakespeare (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Whiles parents to their children will make known, Whereof as many as shall hear that sadness. “A Funeral Elegy” is no longer considered to be Shakespeare’s work. deserts. Not hired, as heaven can witness in my soul. As, had it chanced, thou mightst have done to me. How s'ere enriched by thy plenteous skill. For even if the massive evidence for Shakespeare's authorship stands up to scrutiny, the Elegy faces emotional resistance because of the kind of poem it is. Yet True 'tis, this man, whiles yet he was a man. $9.99 — Paperback Drive me beyond myself, fast friend, soon lost. Should both be like obscured in their end? This article first appeared in the Spring 1996 Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter. My truth stole from my tongue into my heart. Is in the mouth of some in manner scorned, That "Such as is the end, the life proves so. Lost in all the document shuffling is what it might mean that a genius like Shakespeare could write a poem as bad as "A Funeral Elegy." (1612) was. ", Gave sweet redemption, offering up his blood, To conquer death by death, and loose the traps. . . . Professor Stanley Wells of the University of Birmingham began the round by rejecting the identification of W.S. So in his mischiefs is the world accursed: The willful blindness that hoodwinks the eyes, Presuming still it sees, even in the night. How s'ere enriched by thy plenteous skill. . Of hell, even in the triumph that it stood: He thus, for that his guiltless life was spilt. Shall ruined be by death, our grace and strength. . In his pure life, for that his end was worse. Whence, when he falls, who did erewhile aspire. Others were attributed to him in 17th century manuscripts. On the occasion of his death, only 2 1/2 weeks later a poem -->" A Funerall Elegye (1612) ", with 518 lines was submitted by the author "W.S." In 1995 Donald Foster, a professor of English at Vassar College, made a startling case for Shakespeare's being the author of an obscure 578-line poem called ''A Funeral Elegy.'' When the proud height of much affected sin, Shall this man's actions be revealed, to show. Is envy, whose endeavors fruitless pains. For popular applause and power's commission. Does think most safety doth remain above. His taintless goodness, his desertful merit. Abrams invited me to help him mount a fresh and more assertive case for Shake- Adamson, Sylvia. How to augment their portion and ambition, Do toil their giddy brains, and ever sweat. A Funeral Elegy. privilege of truth, who can warrant more in his behalf than I undertook to As time can boast of, both for love and trust: So henceforth all (great glory to his blood), The wicked end their honor with their sin. whatsoever is here done, is done to him and to him only. A FUNERAL ELEGY Since Time, and his predestinated end, Abridg'd the circuit of his hopeful days, Whiles both his Youth and Virtue did intend The good endeavors of deserving praise, 5 What memorable monument can last Whereon to build his never-blemsh'd name But his own worth, wherein his life was grac'd-- In knowing, but for that it was the best, For fair conditions, guests that soonest win, If these, or all of these, knit fast in one, As those descended from illustrious blood. Above fate's reach, his singleness was such. For whom and whose Which, pain to many men, I do not owe it. Were even as boundless as their prompt desires; Only like lords, like subjects to their will. Nor could disgest, as some loose mimics can. Shall ruined be by death, our grace and strength, Youth, memory and shape that made us fresh. Are, without ornaments to praise them, vile: And such as have that beauty, well deserve. To speak the language of a servile breath. Admired more for being firm than strange. William Peter was born in Devonshire on or about Christmas Day of 1582, the younger son of an Exeter merchant. His pleading best perfections as neglected. Whereby t' enroll my name, as this of thine. But his own worth, wherein his life was graced. Foreshowing what he was, and what should be, Most true presage; and he discharged the same, Though in the complemental phrase of words. As they will all go weeping to their beds. To progress out his life, I could display, That full of days he might have lived to see, The grave in peace, the times that should succeed. Which now sits mourning his untimely spoil. Once in his proper self, then in his name; Against the rigor that hath overgone him, Which guides to doing well, wherein so few, As then the loss of one, whose inclination, So specially his friends, in soft compassion. When sin shall tread on merit in the dust, Remembering what he was, with comfort then. His due deserts, this sentence on him gives, Those perfect graces which were ever wont, From which detained, and banished in th' exile. Until which end, there is none rightly can. Which, by a life well led, may honor have? The … Our virtual staged reading of "A Funeral Elegy" and "The Phoenix And Turtle" from 12/30/20Intro 0:00Elegy 2:09Phoenix 37:33Outro 41:30 included in three 'complete' editions of Shakespeare published in America: Bevington (updated fourth edition), Riverside (second edition), and Norton. May shorten when it please, and justly take, Whose fame the angels in melodious choirs. The Wonder of Shakespeare One who reads a few of Shakespeare's great plays and then the meager story of his life is generally filled with a vague wonder. When sin shall tread on merit in the dust. By vain conceit, to please such ones as know it. Will blame the one's hard fate, the other's madness; Whiles such as do recount that tale of woe. The good t' exceed the wicked in their life. Which hardest fate and time thus can lay on me. His due deserts, this sentence on him gives, "He died in life, yet in his death he lives.". Article excerpt. Yet here on earth thy fame lives ever whole, In every heart sealed up, in every tongue, Fit matter to discourse, no day prevented. Which might make known his unaffected care, His bosom and his store, which did declare. Which, underneath the roof of safe content, Feeds on the bread of rest, and takes delight. As he was both an husband and a father. Whiles hope remains of gain (base fee of slaves). To spend his spring of days in sacred schools. Which paid to heaven the debt that it did owe. by Stephanie Caruana. By death, which was made subject to the curse, Might in like manner be reproved of guilt. In praise of virtue and reproach of folly). Sith as that ever he maintained the same? With joint assistance to grace one another, But since the sum of all that can be said, Can be but said that "He was good" (which wholly. There seems, however, to be a simple answer. W[illiam] S[hakespeare], "A Funeral Elegy for Master William Peter,"(London: G.Eld for T.Thorpe, 1612). sake I will not forget to remember any friendly respects to you, or to any “Well, Holmes,” I said, laying down the morning paper, “have you seen the report of the newly discovered ‘Funeral Elegy’ by Shakespeare?”. Blood, pomp, state, honor, glory and command. From what doth batter virtue now and then. Have fittest times in reason's rules to thrive, And those are much more noble in the mind. Those noble twins of heaven-infused races, With reason's golden mean to make defense, To progress out his life, I could display, The grave in peace, the times that should succeed, And though his qualities might well deserve. A Funeral Elegy was written in February 1612 by “W. In nothing surely prosperous, but hope. The attribution to Shakespeare of A Funeral Elegy (1612), by W.S., is often found unconvincing. . W[illiam] S[hakespeare], "A Funeral Elegy for Master William Peter," In 1997 A Funeral Elegy (on the death of William Peter), by 'W.S.' NEWS ITEM: With the aid of computers, scholars are attributing a poem titled “A Funeral Elegy,” published in 1612 and signed “W.S.,” to William Shakespeare. Whereto the world and heat of sin entices. T' enlarge my thoughts was hindered at first. Since time, and his predestinated end, Abridged the circuit of his hopeful days, Whiles both his youth and virtue did intend The good endeavors of deserving praise, What memorable monument can last Whereon to build his never-blemished … Here shall be reckoned up the constant faith. Dedication to the Elegy TO MASTER JOHN PETER OF BOWHAY IN DEVON, ESQUIRE. Despising chiefly men in fortunes wracked. The following excerpt from a funeral elegy is the most famous because of its reference to Burbage playing Shakespeare's characters, most notably his Hamlet scant of breath: A Funeral Elegy On the Death of the Famous Actor, Richard Burbage, Where once it was protested, alway sound. Against the assault of youth's encouragement; (When now his father's death had freed his will), Could make him subject to the drunken rage, And shuns the glad sleights of ensnaring vice. Yet time, the father of unblushing truth. Donald Foster. . Short exposé of W.S., the true Shakespeare, author of "A Funeral Elegy" ,1612 Than time's strict flinty hand will let 'em know. Which their fond dotage ever more admires. What more thou didst deserve than in thy name. When those weak houses of our brittle flesh. For could my worthless brain find out but how. Can merit praise, then justly may we say. Then why should he, Those saints before the everlasting throne. Do feel the greatest loss they could have had. An elegy, written under Shakespeare's byline. Let then the false suggestions of the froward, By suppositions fond and thoughts untoward, That may disprove their malice, and confound, Their souls into the roll that doth unsound. The love I bore to your brother, and will do to his memory, hath cravedfrom me this last duty of a friend; I am herein but a second to theprivilege of truth, who can … "(Forum: "A Funeral Elegy" by W. S.) By Foster, Donald W. Read preview. Exercise in this kind I will little affect, and am less addicted Are in themselves but heathenish and profaned, And much more peaceful is a mean condition. And right the hopes of my endangered youth. Subject Headings problem of WS's Funeral Elegy was not seriously debated until 1994, when Richard Abrams reopened discussion at the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association ("'Miracle'"). Shines not amidst the dark of their dissension? Whence young men sometime grow unfortunate; To purchase from all hearts a steady love; Than that he was so constant to his friends. To speak the language of a servile breath. Whence, when he falls, who did erewhile aspire, But virtues and perfections in our powers, Against th' assault of death, who to relieve him. Those noble twins of heaven-infused races. “A Funeral Elegy” is no longer considered to be Shakespeare’s work. Those perfect graces which were ever wont, Only those hopes which fate denies to grant, Who, if it were in plenty, still would want, From which detained, and banished in th' exile, Whereon to lean and rest itself the while, But the weak comfort of the hapless, "hope. The chaste embracements of conjugal love, For in his life his love was so unfeigned. That Christ was his, and he was friendship's rock: Though in the complemental phrase of words, Slacker in love, he had been longer lived, So henceforth all (great glory to his blood), Sincere in singleness of heart, adventers. Several poems published anonymously have been attributed by scholars to Shakespeare. Feel what distemperature this chance hath bred. That had not made thee know how much I prized thee, To think love best in silence: for I sized thee, By what I would have been, not only ready, Since then I still reserved to try the worst. Falls deeper down, for that he climbed higher. A bloody butchery, by the British troops: or, The runaway fight of the regulars … [To which is annexed] A funeral elegy to the imortal memory of those worthies, who were slain in the battle of Concord. Nor could disgest, as some loose mimics can. (London: G.Eld for T.Thorpe, 1612). For should he lie obscured without a tomb. Yet time, the father of unblushing truth, Whereof as many as shall hear that sadness. Without true proof and knowledge of a friend, Sincere in singleness of heart, adventers. Though I, rewarded with some sadder taste, Of knowing shame, by feeling it have proved, My country's thankless misconstruction cast, By some whose fortunes, sunk into the wane. To raise thee from the sepulcher of dust, Undoubtedly thou shouldst have partage now, Of life with me, and heaven be counted just, Where life is missed; whereby discomfort should, Right his old griefs, and former joys retain, Which now with thee are leaped into thy tomb. By shunning all invitements strange, of those, In being rare in shame (which strives to raise. To give fit cause, ere love begin to end: His unfeigned friendship where it least was sought. 1775] Salem Printed and sold by E. Russell Created / Published Boston, 1775. Did jointly both, in their peculiar graces, With reason's golden mean to make defense. Look hither then, you that enjoy the youth, Of your best days, and see how unexpected. Birth, blood, and ancestors, are none of ours, Nor can we make a proper challenge to them, But virtues and perfections in our powers. This is Shakespeare for a funeral that reflects on facing death with courage. The battle over the A Funeral Elegy by W.S. Comparing by thy death what thou hast been. Academic journal article Shakespeare Studies "A Funeral Elegy": W(illiam) S(hakespeare)'s "Best-Speaking witnesses. Those blessings which their sufferance did urge. ORDER PART VERSE … . In life thou lived'st, in death thou died'st beloved. But whiles the minds of men can judge sincerely. And that same hope, so lame, so unprevailing, Which being crossed, gives matter of bewailing. While thou hadst life; I took this task upon me. . Had yielded store to thy well-abled quill. Who can make friendship, in those times of change. (Fair lovely branch too soon cut off) to thee. Whereto the world and heat of sin entices. Which afterwards his praises will express. And though his qualities might well deserve, Just commendation, yet his furnished mind, Knowing the best, and therefore not presuming. Which wise posterity shall give him then; T' ennoble that best part, although his state. And not oppressed by wrath's unhappy sin. All to their joys in quiet on their beds, Of torture and affliction ere they gained. Th' unsteady change of his fantastic forms, When the proud height of much affected sin, Shall this man's actions be revealed, to show. Soothed not the current of besotted fashion. In equal worth--time shall to time renew 't. Were even as boundless as their prompt desires; Whence now retired home, to a home indeed, Than that he was so constant to his friends. A FUNERAL ELEGY. . The poem was included in the Shakespeare 2020 Project because the Project took its reading list from the Riverside Shakespeare (Second Edition), which was published in 1997 and includes the poem. (1613) rages on in the pages of the London Times Literary Supplement.. His flourishing and fair long-lived deserts. Who when they die, die all, shall not entomb. Here is an unknown country boy, poor and poorly educated according to the standards of his age, who arrives at the great city of London and goes to … Shakespeare Studies 25 (1997): 141–70. That pities not thy sad and sudden wrong, In this last act of friendship, sacrifice, My love to thee, which I could not set forth. A Funeral Elegy. But death to such gives unremembered graves. Pity it was that blood had not been prized. Although I could not learn, whiles yet thou wert. . to, but there must be miracle in that labor which, to witness my “I have heard something about it,” Sherlock Holmes replied. It was, for a short time in the late 1990s, thought to have been written by Shakespeare. TO MASTER JOHN PETER. Play in the strongest closet of my breast, But whether doth the stream of my mischance. Of that same ignorance which makes them blind. In accents brief to thee, O thou deceased! So that he dies but once, but doubly lives. And limn thee to the world but as thou wert. However, according to David Bevington, 'the attribution remains uncertain'. of those that have loved him for himself, and himself for his One greater than his faith, which did persever. Though not in eminent courts or places great, Where he enjoyed his birth, life, death, and seat. A Funeral Elegy Lyrics To Master JOHN PETER of Bowhay in Devon, Esquire. Of what he was, then shall his virtues grow. (Well-worthy to be termed a rudeness rather), For in his life his love was so unfeigned. In minds from whence endeavor doth proceed. If I must die. The love I bore to your brother, and will do to his memory, hath craved May one day lay ope malice which hath crossed it. Read "Funeral Elegy" by William Shakespeare available from Rakuten Kobo. That gave peace to his bread, bread to his health; Which ever he maintained in sweet content, For in the vineyard of heaven-favored learning. Nor servile to be liked, free from control. Their trust to be betrayed by being caught. Play in the strongest closet of my breast. 19 Ratings The Wonder of Shakespeare One who reads a few of Shakespeare's great plays and then the meager … Yet here on earth thy fame lives ever whole. Still witness to the world. The authorship of some poems published under Shakespeare's name in his lifetime has also been questioned. Normalized text, ed. None have received universal acceptance. Thou didst deserve and hast; for though thy soul. William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616) was … Hence conster they with corrupt commentaries, The text of malice, which so often varies, Which understands all things amiss, whose light. Gave death for free good will, and wounds for love. It was, for a short time in the late 1990s, thought to have been written by Shakespeare. Who sit with crowns of glory on their heads, Washed white in blood, from earth hence have not gone. In nothing surely prosperous, but hope... Who when they die, die all, shall not entomb. Than busy questions such as talkers make. Ford has been mentioned, and this article gives some of the evidence for his authorship, in particular many word combinations and single words (sometimes characteristic of Ford) that occur in the elegy and in Ford's prose works, poems, and plays, but never in Shakespeare. Their name by doing what they do not care). The attribution received much attention and was accepted into the canon by several highly respected Shakespeare editors. Though 't be not as I would, 'tis as I can: In minds from whence endeavor doth proceed, From thee, fair mark of sorrow, let me frame, Some ampler work of thank, wherein to tell. Never untrue, where once he love professed; Long sought though rarely found, and he is best. In knowing, but for that it was the best, The one to lodge the other, both like framed, For fair conditions, guests that soonest win, If trim behavior, gestures mild, discreet. That Christ was his, and he was friendship's rock: A rock of friendship figured in his name. Shakespeare's only elegiac poem -- if A Funeral Elegyis indeed Shakespeare's -- is a work probably indebted to Donne's mourning poems, yet, more certainly, it is . Endeavors, modest speech, beseeming mirth. So in his mischiefs is the world accursed: Hence conster they with corrupt commentaries. Normalized text, ed. Remembrance of their worth we may preserve. Abridged the circuit of his hopeful days, Whiles both his youth and virtue did intend, Whereon to build his never-blemished name. A Funeral Elegy , Shakespeare, and Elizabeth Cary A Funeral Elegy , Shakespeare, and Elizabeth Cary 2000-01-01 00:00:00 JAMES HIRSH The Bard's New Clothes A Funerall Elegye in memory of the late vertuous Maister William Peeter, a 578-line poem published in 1612 by someone who used the initials "W. S.," was guardedly attributed to Shakespeare by Donald W. Foster in a 1989 book. So that their glory die not with their breath. The poem was included in the Shakespeare 2020 Project because the Project took its reading list from the Riverside Shakespeare (Second Edition), which was published in 1997 and includes the poem. Excerpt from "A Funeral Elegy", lines 492-50 On January 25th, 1612 a certain William Peter is said to have been murdered by a stab in the (rear)head. Of boast, such as the common breath affords; He was in use most fast, in tongue most plain, Nor amongst all those virtues that forever. Tributes to the great actor poured from the pens of good writers whose words he had made even better. Shall speak for him when he shall lie below; Of what he was, then shall his virtues grow. In 1989, Donald Foster attributed A Funeral Elegy for Master William Peter to William Shakespeare based on a stylometric computer analysis of its grammatical patterns and idiosyncratic word usage. So that he dies but once, but doubly lives. Shakespearean moment, it may be more illuminating to locate W.S.' Which, harvest-like, did yield again the crop. from me this last duty of a friend; I am herein but a second to the The pamphlet was registered by a stationer, Thomas Thorp, whose livelihood depended chiefly on the Shakespeare-Jonson theatrical circle and who had published Shakespeare’s Sonnets in 1609. The love I bore to your brother, and will do to his memory, hath craved from me this last duty of a friend; 0.3. Donald Foster. For when the world lies wintered in the storms. S.,” a poet of “name and credit” closely familiar with Shakespearean texts. . For its own sustenance, both day and night; Whiles others, plotting which way to be great. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $5.99 . Of his short-lived deserts; but still they must, Claim fit respect, that they, in every limb, Remembering what he was, with comfort then. Proceed most truly from us, if we do them. Of fond conceit, such as this age affords, Seemed rather answers which the wise embrace. 3 reviews. The Funeral Elegy Poem: Is the emperor wearing any clothes? A Funeral Elegyliminally within a peculiarly Donnean moment, the creation of a new form of English elegy. The attribution to Shakespeare of A Funeral Elegy (1612), by W.S., is often found unconvincing. $5.99 — Paperback, April 8, 2012: $9.99 . 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